Vote for #ELTchat for 25/06 @21BST

Saturday, June 21, 2014 12:00 | Filled in Polls
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Time to Vote for our last #ELTchat before summer

Next #ELTchat on Wednesday 2e/06 at 21:00 p.m. BST

Each picture tells a story. — at Tamandaré - Praia dos Carneiros, Pernambuco. 2 by Roseli Serra on #eltpics

Each picture tells a story. — at Tamandaré – Praia dos Carneiros, Pernambuco. 2
by Roseli Serra on #eltpics

 

Propose a topic, vote in our poll and join  #ELTchat!

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to  join the chat if your topic  is chosen.  You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.

Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.

Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

 

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past.

Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat.

Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available

Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side.

If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again!

Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

 

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

 

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

CPD in the Age of the Internet: an #ELT Chat Summary 21/05/2014

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 18:41 | Filled in Summary
The full text of the topic was:  Continued Professional Development in the Age of the Internet: who? what? why? when? The aim of the chat would be to look at how teachers continue their professional develop via online means as opposed to face-to-face courses and should question how this done, through what means, is it successful, are there any advantages/ disadvantages?  Anthony Ash wrote the summary which is reproduced here from his blog.

CPD in the Age of the Internet: an ELT Chat Summary

Continued Professional Development has always played an important role in teacher education post pre-service training. For sure this pivotal role will continue as we move further into the digital era, however, the mode of delivery has already begun to change, eltchatlogowith more and more courses moving towards online delivery. The main aim of this chat was to explore how teachers continue with CPD via online modes of delivery as opposed to face-to-face courses and to ask whether there are any advantages or disadvantages to this?

As the first shot was fired to signal the beginning of the chat, some were quick to reach the first hurdle: the sheer abundance of CPD materials available online. @LizziePinard quickly linked to the wealth of seminars, webinars and blogs available on the British Council’s Teaching English website (http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/continuing-professional-development) and @MarjorieRosenberg pointed to the ELT Chat store of past summaries and transcripts as another source (http://eltchat.org/wordpress/eltchat-summaries-index/).

Too much? Too little? What about the people? 

In trying to tackle the question of whether this plethora of material is to our advantage or not, @MarjorieRosenberg made the upbeat suggestion that it could be disadvantageous as there is simply “too much to take advantage of”. @LizziePinard highlighted the fact that online courses would not suit everyone, as some might prefer or even need face-to-face contact; however, she was quick to stress that the flexibility of fitting an online course around one’s own timetable is clearly advantageous for some teachers.

Further to Lizzie’s point, @adi_rajan spoke about an ever growing chasm between vis-à-vis courses and online options in terms of the amount of choice and availability, referring to the quantity of content available in the digital age as “astonishing.” IH World’s @Shaunwilden agreed that it is easy to “get swamped by all that’s offered online” but @MarjorieRosenberg did point to the fact that one can always choose where and when to do online courses.

Moving towards the people behind online courses, @MarjorieRosenberg highlighted the fact that many moderators of online CPD courses need to free up a lot of time in order to respond to posts in a sufficient manner. @Cioccas highlighted that time differences can cause delays when responding to posts and comments but did specify that the internet does simultaneously help to overcome “the tyranny of distance.” While many CPD courses come at a significant cost, particularly when delivered face-to-face, online courses can be “free or relatively inexpensive” according to @adi_rajan.

Finally and perhaps most importantly, one of the greatest advantages of online CPD courses is the creation of a global community (@MarjorieRosenberg).

Isn’t it all a question of formality? 

A few of the participants looked at ways in which teachers actually develop via online resources and focused particularly on digital collaboration between teachers. @Marisa_C highlighted that collaborating face-to-face is something which not all teachers are used to for one reason or another and @cioccas went one step further, saying if teachers do not collaborate vis-à-vis then we cannot “expect them to take to doing it online.” However, she did mention that online platforms, such as ELT Chat, often bring together “like-minded people” and @LizziePinard pointed to Twitter and Facebook groups being good for discussion and development.

When it comes to what works for who – be it an online platform with threads and comments or a standardised course which is delivered through the internet  – @Angelos_bollas pointed to the fact that it all depends on “learning styles”. For some, the “asynchronous” approach of many online resources are exactly what maximise their engagement and focus, yet for others an online course could only differ from a face-to-face one in as far as the handouts are digitalised and little more – for such people, organisation and a holistic approach are key and essential.

@LizziePinard summed it up well in her tweet: “Online there are more formalised and less formalised ways of developing. The secret is to make it work [for you].”

How to get the most out of online CPD?

With this question @LizziePinard took the chat in the direction of helping teachers to know “where” online resources are in relation to “what” topic so that people know where to look. Specific points of reference were mentioned earlier, such as the British Council website; however,@Joannacre pointed out that the “human connection” is a good starting point – interact with other teachers online and they might be able to point you in the right direction for more materials on the topic you are interested in. As @MarjorieRosenberg put it: “You can’t manage the content without the connections.” So, it seems even in the digital era, people still play an important role in your Continued Professional Development.

Problems and issues

Of course, everything that is good also has a bad side and in terms of online CPD that is the “lack of accreditation” according to @Marisa_C. Marisa highlights that this is not an issue for some but for others, unfortunately, academic management might not recognise the time spent engaged with online development.

@Ciccoas asked how this can be influenced and eventually changed? And the answer? It seems this might be left open to another ELT Chat, although @adi_rajan did respond “it’s like talking to a wall” with reference to the attitude of management towards online CPD.

Where is it all going?

It seems from the comments towards the end of the chat, online CPD is developing most quickly in the areas of teaching-related blogs and wikis. @Eannengrenoble claims this represents a sort of return to an ideal where “learning is for pleasure” – in this case the learning is teacher development. Eannen mentions that by reading blogs and wikis teachers learn and therefore become more competent and, therefore, anything is possible.

Finally, @Marisa_C says that a “teacher’s blog can be seen as evidence of their CPD more so than certificates.”

   About the Author

Antony Ash – @ashowski on Twitter is a senior Teacher at IH Torun (Poland) where he is working on developing as a teacher and getting some experience in Teacher Training and Development.  His blog is English Language Teaching – beyond the sentence

Marisa Constantinides

CELTA & DELTA tutor at CELT Athens. Love connecting with educators. Moderate #ELTchat every Wednesday. Join & share the learning!

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Voting open for our next #ELTchat on Wednesday 18/06/2014

Saturday, June 14, 2014 17:40 | Filled in Propose a Topic

Propose a topic, vote in our poll and join #ELTchat! field

Photo Credit: Katarina 2353 via Compfight cc

Every Wednesday on Twitter

Next #ELTchat on Wednesday 18/06 at 12:00 p.m. BST

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to join the chat if your topic is chosen. You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.   Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.   Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past. Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat. Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side. If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again! Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

Propose a topic for our next #ELTchat on Wednesday 11/06/2014

Saturday, June 7, 2014 10:08 | Filled in Polls, Propose a Topic

Vote Now!

Every Wednesday on Twitter

Next #ELTchat on Wednesday 11/06 at 21:00 p.m. BST

7950216844_54c2383a23Photo Credit: A Guy Taking Pictures via Compfight cc

Propose a topic, vote in our poll and join  #ELTchat!

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to  join the chat if your topic  is chosen.  You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.

Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.

Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

 

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past.

Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat.

Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available

Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side.

If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again!

Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

 

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

 

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

Marisa Constantinides

CELTA & DELTA tutor at CELT Athens. Love connecting with educators. Moderate #ELTchat every Wednesday. Join & share the learning!

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Please Vote for #ELTchat on 04/06/2014

Saturday, May 31, 2014 11:55 | Filled in Summary

Next #ELTchat on Wednesday 04/06 at 12:00 p.m. BST

Inflatable Swimming Ring
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Bernat Casero via Compfight

Propose a topic

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to  join the chat if your topic  is chosen.  You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.

Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.

Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

 

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past.

Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat.

Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available

Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side.

If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again!

Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

 

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

 

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

Marisa Constantinides

CELTA & DELTA tutor at CELT Athens. Love connecting with educators. Moderate #ELTchat every Wednesday. Join & share the learning!

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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Suggest a topic for May 28th

Friday, May 23, 2014 8:02 | Filled in Polls, Propose a Topic

Vote for #ELTchat on Wednesday 28/05 at 21:00 p.m. BST

 


Studying by Roseli Serra on #eltpics

Studying by Roseli Serra on #eltpics

Propose a topic, vote in our poll and join our #ELTchat!

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to  join the chat if your topic  is chosen.  You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.

Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.

Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

 

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past.

Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat.

Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available

Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side.

If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again!

Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

 

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

 

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

Suggest topics for 21st May

Friday, May 16, 2014 13:56 | Filled in Polls, Propose a Topic

Next #ELTchat on Wednesday 21/05 at 12:00 p.m. BST

Cast your vote:

You’d be nuts to miss it without a good raisin …..
 
Nuts and raisins by Martin Eayrs on #eltpics

Nuts and raisins by Martin Eayrs on #eltpics

Propose a topic, vote in our poll and join our #ELTchat!

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to  join the chat if your topic  is chosen.  You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.

Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.

Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

 

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past.

Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat.

Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available

Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side.

If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again!

Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

 

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

 

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

Vote for #ELTchat on May 14th

Saturday, May 10, 2014 16:26 | Filled in Polls, Propose a Topic

Next #ELTchat on Wednesday 14/05 at 21:00 p.m. BST

Photo by @Marisa_C

Photo by @Marisa_C Spring 2012

Propose a topic, vote in our poll and join our #ELTchat!

If you are proposing a topic, please make every effort to  join the chat if your topic  is chosen.  You can find out information about how to follow an #ELTchat here.

Please also note that the chat moderators do monitor the voting. Cases of block voting are followed up and, in such a case, the votes will be disqualified and results of poll will be announced on our blog.

Since we started #ELTchat in September 2010, we have discussed a wide number of topics, but with many new members joining our conversations every week, it is very natural that we will get requests for topics which we “have done”.

 

Check out our Summaries & Transcripts Index

Make sure your idea has not already been discussed in the past.

Check our summaries page to see if your idea has already been included in a past #ELTchat.

Here you can find links to all the transcripts and summaries available

Click here to find it or look for it on the pages menu on the right hand side.

If you see your topic but would still like to discuss a different aspect or set of issues, do submit it and we will consider including it again!

Read those great posts which we have collected and make sure you visit the pages of the bloggers who contributed them too!!!!

 

Please, include topics which

  • have not been covered already in previous #ELTchats
  • are relevant to ELT teachers and teaching foreign languages
  • are not targeted attacks on individuals or institutions
  • are simply and clearly expressed.

 

Editing your topic

The #ELTchat moderators reserve the right to edit or reword a topic or not to include in the poll if it does not follow the above guidelines.

 

See you on #ELTchat on Wednesday!!!

Marisa Constantinides

CELTA & DELTA tutor at CELT Athens. Love connecting with educators. Moderate #ELTchat every Wednesday. Join & share the learning!

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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Group Cohesion in the ELT class – #ELTchat Summary 30/04/2014

Saturday, May 3, 2014 20:09 | Filled in Summary

The full title of this chat was “How important is group cohesion in the ELT class? How can we best achieve it?”  and was first posted by Mary Sousa - @mary28sou – oner blog here

Rainbow
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: jakerome via Compfight

 

Summary

As one participant expressed it: “Interesting topic…but BIG.” The 21 participants in this evening chat bravely dealt with numerous aspects of group cohesion in the ELT class.

The chat participants’ comments are divided into two topics: theoretical and practical.

Theoretically speaking…

Cohesive groups learn more (according to Wikipedia, this is supported by research)
Cooperative learning – an instructional approach which promotes cohesion
Building a sense of community and trust in the learners, a sense of building something together
Cohesion with adults, and with younger students
Group decision making, roles in groups, leadership, negotiating
Shared responsibilities, group roles and tasks
Dynamics of scapegoating in small groups
Feedback in a cohesive group is positive, constructive – not painful or demeaning
“A mistake is a gift to the class”

Cultural aspects

In the business world, team building is the concept…mostly the same as cohesion.
Business English students may be dour – can they be shaken? But some business groups are a blast – depends on the business people

Practically speaking…

 

Problems

Extremely mixed levels, company hierarchy, mix of students’ ages, large university classes
Do learners actually want a sense of community? Sometimes they like to be individual.
Is it good to detect the ‘leader’ of a group and build a relationship?

  • there are really several roles in groups (artist, worker, ideas person etc.)
  • in-company adults – good to relate to the ‘leader’
  • find out early who might be a problem student and win them over

Competition

  • Can you have too much collaboration and not enough competition?
  • Is competition being bred out of the classroom? Some is healthy.
  • Groups can compete with other groups
  • It disrupts cohesion if only the best are praised

Students being too similar

With teens it can lead to the kind of competition which is not conducive to group cohesion
less discussion, doesn’t stretch them

Taking over an existing class
Weaker students
Teenage group too cohesive, turns against teacher, children can be cruel

Solutions

Starting up
important to build cohesion early on, bad habits grow quickly
group negotiates class content for the week
start lesson with compliments, end with thank yous
write a letter for every new course
goal setting, class rules – sanctions for breaking rules
cohesion building not only a startup thing, must be ongoing

Cooperative learning activities
Name the group
Slogans, rhymes, raps
Stickers – adults love them, teens are too cool for them
Prizes, not only for right answers: for best drawing/most effort etc
Help students find things they like about each other
‘Teacherless’ tasks with feedback afterwards
‘looking for the ideal language learner’ (from the Hadfield book)

Online group cohesiveness
wikispaces classroom for writing course
email, Facebook (secret groups)
encourage them to share own lives, question and comment, create “bonds”
introduce themselves to each other via photos
Do a PLN lesson when many egotistical people in the group – they work out the benefits of group learning

Saying goodbye
finish gently, don’t stop abruptly
remember good things, send thank you notes

Finally…
When it comes to group cohesiveness, this chat was a winner! The atmosphere was characterized by comments like these:
Bring your food to the computer :-)
…Can’t stay away! This is addictive
Cool and grand to see you pls stay on
You’re raring away there tonight :-))

 

Links and resources:
http://t.co/SHo5I1fbQq Wikipedia entry about group cohesiveness
http://t.co/9lFnK2AXXB Blog post from the SkillsYouNeed blog
http://t.co/9lFn%E2%80%A6 Marisa’s blog post „Storming Out or Norming in?”
http://bit.ly/1hZYIPj Dynamics of Scapegoating in Small Groups
http://t.co/relDMCIZdh „Remember when” padlet
http://t.co/i3NanhC03t example of introducing each other online with photos

Classroom Dynamics, by Jill Hadfield (Resource Books for Teachers, 1992)

Marisa Constantinides

CELTA & DELTA tutor at CELT Athens. Love connecting with educators. Moderate #ELTchat every Wednesday. Join & share the learning!

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The Benefits of Observations and Feedback #ELTchat Summary 4/16/2014

Saturday, May 3, 2014 19:50 | Filled in Summary

The full title of this chat was “Observations and Feedback: what do you get out of being observed and what makes good or bad feedback?” and was first posted on April 26, 2014 by @ashowski on his blog here 

 

Summary

As the chat began, the elephant in the room was clear: who exactly is doing the observing?
@Sandymillin and @Ashowski quickly pointed out observations can be carried out by both peers – known as peer observation – and by Senior Academic Staff, such as Senior Teachers, an ADoS or even a DoS – perhaps better known as formal observations.

…………………
Most of the participants were quick to point out that the main difference between the two types of observations is primarilystress: formal observations are compulsory and can be included in end of year progress reports, while peer observations are usually arranged between teachers who are interested in accelerating their own professional development.
After quickly establishing that there will also be an element of ‘personality’ involved in observations and feedback sessions, @Ashowski asked “what elements go into producing good/bad feedback?”

…………………
@Shaunwilden quickly pointed out that the whole process starts “way before the feedback session”, highlighting that an observation, particularly if it is to be followed up with a useful feedback session, should have pre-determined focus areas agreed on by the observer and the observee. @HadaLitim named these “pre-obs meetings.”

…………………
The main argument behind having these meetings is so that the teacher can prepare in advance, e.g. focus on instruction giving, conducting feedback and drilling, and then receive feedback on how well they delivered the lesson in terms of the three above areas.

…………………

@Sandymillin made a point of ensuring the observer should always “guide” and “lead” feedback sessions, asking the teacher about their performance with regards to the focus areas. This way the session is a meeting of equals and together they can ‘discover’ and ‘evaluate’ the performance and not simply “tell” the teacher about their performance.

…………………
It was agreed that feedback which involves describing every stage of the lesson is not conducive to progress and only results in what @HadaLitim and @Sandymillin described as a “traumatic” experience for the teacher. An educator cannot perform outstandingly in all areas, which is why there needs to be areas to focus on. However, it was pointed out that the observer does indeed see more of the lesson than just the focus areas, which he or she can comment on and from that the next areas for development could be determined. The observers eyes “see more” than what the teacher’s do.

…………………
This approach should result in what @SLT_Kat described as “positive, consistent and not scary” feedback sessions, with CPD at the focus and not ‘catching out’ teachers.

…………………
After having established some of the basics in structuring good feedback sessions, @ChrisOzog then put forward an interesting piece of practice: a lesson report swap shop. As the discussion progressed, this idea was discussed and explored. What the participants eventually came up with was a sort of “unobserved observation” (@HadaLitim), whereby the observer and observee meet before the lesson to establish the focus points and then afterwards they meet again so that the teacher can feedback on how well they performed.

…………………
The argument here is the most useful role an observer can play is as a guide: the teacher projects their ideas and feelings onto the observer and together they explore how things went, how they could be improved and what other areas to focus on. The observer’s role is merely to guide the teacher in the right direction.

…………………
In summary, to ensure feedback sessions are a positive experience for all involved, it is important to set out focus areas, feedback on these and then develop new areas for future development. The unobserved observation could also be a conducive format to continuing your professional development while not consuming too much time.

…………………

Image source: giulia.forsythe (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gforsythe/), under CC BY-SA 2.0

…………………

To view the full transcript please click here

Marisa Constantinides

CELTA & DELTA tutor at CELT Athens. Love connecting with educators. Moderate #ELTchat every Wednesday. Join & share the learning!

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